Growing trends in the media and digital sector for 2013

Digital media

Millward Brown, has released its annual top 10 digital and media predictions, highlighting growing trends in the media sector.

They expect 2013 to be another dynamic year for online display, mobile and social media. Consumers have ever higher expectations of intelligent digital advertising approaches, and marketers will need to deliver more sophisticated campaigns to keep pace with what works.

You can view a detailed interactive version of the top 10 digital and media predictions on the Millward Brown website.

1. Facebook‘s monetisation drive will provide new, richer advertising opportunities for brands.

2. Social media listening evolves from monitoring to insight.

3. Emergence of ‘mobile remotes’ make it a central pillar of smart communication plans.

4. The great paywall makes for scarcity of premium eyeballs.

5. Omnichannel marketing helps brands build on meaningful moments of engagement.

6. Social TV grows up and becomes part of the narrative rather than a conversation about the narrative.

7. Mobile advertising in Africa tackles the smartphone divide.

8. Greater collaboration needed to make the most of real-time optimisation.

9. Better aligning of online display with objectives.

10. More meaningful mobile engagement via apps and actions.

See the complete report below.

To explore these predictions in more detail, click here to download a Pdf copy.

Source: Millward Brown

The photoshop magic behind McDonald’s advertising campaigns

English: The mdonalds logo from the late 90s
McDonalds (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Last week a customer from Toronto named Isabel M. got onto a website created by McDonald’s Canada, which allows customers to ask any question they want. Her question was, “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what is in the store?” Looking at this as an opportunity to get some good public opinion going in favour of McDonalds, Director of marketing for McDonald’s Canada, Hope Bagozzi, addressed the question herself.

Bagozzi enters a typical McDonalds and orders a quarter pounder and takes it along with her to the Watt International,the advertising agency, to get it shot. McDonald’s claim is that the only doctoring they do is to make the ingredients visible so the consumer. Towards the end, Bagozzi also adds that the photoshop they use on the final images is only to “enhance the color and any accidents that might happen during preparation, which obviously doesn’t show the product in its best light.”

I am impressed with courage to take the customer behind the scenes. What do you think? Are revealing videos like this a good marketing strategy for McDonald’s? Or is the risk of potentially negative PR too great to consider something like this for your own company?